A floor is exposed to high loads every day. Due to its robust and resistant material properties, parquet is therefore one of the most popular floor coverings.

However, in order for your parquet to withstand these stresses over a long period of time, it needs the correct cleaning and care. In this article you will learn how to maintain the different types of parquet properly and what is important in this respect.

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What is the surface of the parquet?

Its surface is decisive for the optimal cleaning and maintenance of parquet.

Various types of surface finishing protect parquet from dirt, moisture and wear.

Parquet can either be oiled or waxed or lacquered .

Depending on the method, the parquet has differences in its resistance and therefore requires different care.

For oiled or waxed parquet, the surface of the floor is protected by applying parquet oil or wax.

The natural raw materials do not form an additional layer on the parquet, but penetrate into the wood and the surface is impregnated.

This keeps the pores of the wood open and breathable, which largely preserves the naturalness of the parquet and has a positive effect on the room climate.

However, loads on oiled or waxed soils can act directly, increasing the need for care.

In the case of lacquered parquet, on the other hand, the surface is completely sealed by applying parquet lacquer.

The additional protective layer makes the floor more robust and resistant to stress and is easier to maintain compared to oiled or waxed floors.

Initial maintenance of parquet

If parquet has been newly laid or freshly sanded, an appropriate initial care is recommended for oiled surfaces.

For this purpose, the parquet is treated with special parquet care oils after careful cleaning from dust and dirt (office chair mats, carpets or similar must be removed beforehand).

These ensure that the wood pores open completely and tannic acid in the wood is neutralised, making the parquet less susceptible to stains and scratches.

In the case of painted parquet, initial maintenance is not necessary in principle. However, in order to make the floor even more robust and resistant, a special parquet Polish can still be applied to the surface.

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Regular cleaning of parquet

The basis for a long beautiful looking and well-kept parquet is the regular cleaning, which is basically the same for all parquet surfaces.

Ideally, parquet parquet should be cleaned dry in the first place. To remove loose dust or dirt, it is best to use a broom or a dry cotton cloth. When cleaning with a vacuum cleaner, it is essential to ensure that it is equipped with a parquet-compatible brush , otherwise scratches can easily occur.

For more thorough cleaning, the parquet should be wiped moist regularly.

It is important that not too much water is used, but that the parquet is only cleaned damply .

Carefully wrensed wipe covers made of pure cotton are optimally suited – a slinging system or a wipe press prove to be very helpful.

For oiled parquet, a small amount of wood floor soap should be added to the mopping water.

Due to the regreasing ingredients contained therein, such as coconut or soy fats, not only coarser dirt can be removed more easily, but the parquet is also additionally maintained during every swipe process.

For wiping with wooden floor soap, besides a bucket with the soapy water, a second bucket with clear water should be ready by flushing out the dirt.

As an alternative to wood floor soap, a oil fresher can be used at regular intervals (approx. every fifth wipe) to refresh the protection of the initial care.

The moist cleaning of painted parquet basically works the same as with oiled parquet. Only special paint soap is used as a cleaning agent instead of the wood floor soap.

Refreshment of parquet care

Even with careful cleaning, the daily stress leaves traces on the parquet floor over time.

Whether oiled or sealed parquet – unsightly signs of wear or minor damage such as scratches or stains can not be completely avoided on any surface.

Depending on the intensity of the stress, intensive cleaning and a refreshof of the parquet care are therefore required sooner or later.

Oiled Maintaining parquet

In order to maintain the protective oil layer as long as possible, the oiled parquet should be thoroughly cleaned regularly with an intensive cleaner and a single disc machine with black pad.

The surface of the parquet is then refreshed with care oil. Parquet care oil is available in both natural and different shades.

By refreshing the oil treatment, the wood becomes saturated and dulled parquet looks as if freshly laid again. The maintenance of oiled parquet should be repeated in living spaces every 2 to 4 years, or more often in the case of heavy use.

Sealed Maintaining parquet

In order to slow down the abrasion of the paint layer by dirt and dust particles, a temporary refresh is also necessary for painted parquet.

For this purpose, the parquet is first thoroughly cleaned with a suitable intensive cleaner and then applied a layer of undiluted paint care. The special care products contain polymer dispersion that reduces abrasion, refreshes the floor and masks minor scratches.

Parquet Care against scratches and stains

One of the most important differences between oiled and painted parquet is the handling in case of damage.

For stubborn stains, undiluted special cleaners are used for oiled surfaces, for varnished floors there are special intensive cleaners or stain removers. Turpentine or methylated spirits are also very useful for stains on sealed parquet.

In the case of scratches in the parquet, the effort is greater with painted parquet.

While fine scratches or cracks in the lacquer can be repaired with special repair kits, deeper scratches or other major damage requires sanding and resealing the entire parquet surface.

In the case of oiled parquet, however, this is not necessary. Even larger scratches or other damage can be partially repaired with relatively little effort.

For this purpose, only the affected area is sanded and a new layer of oil is applied. Fine scratches can also be removed with care oils or furniture polish.

Care products for parquet: This is what matters

Care products for parquet are available from numerous manufacturers in a wide variety of designs in DIY stores and specialist retailers.

The most well-known brands include

  • Dr. Schutz
  • Poliboy
  • Tilo
  • Haro
  • Woca
  • u. from above

Which products is best suited for the respective parquet always depends on the coating used. When purchasing the care product, care must be taken to ensure that it is suitable for the respective parquet surface. In addition, the product should not contain silicone oils or mineral oil derivatives if possible.

Better are care products with water-soluble and regreasing polymers or waxes.

Decisive for the selection of the appropriate parquet care is always the manufacturer’s care instructions. In most cases, it also contains specific product recommendations or is their own product series from the manufacturer.

The best tips for protecting, care and cleaning Parquet

  • Protect the parquet against too much dirt by placing protective mats in front of the door and not entering the floor with street shoes. It is best to use slippers or walk barefoot.
  • In particular, sharp, hard objects, such as small stones and sand, or shoe heels can quickly damage the parquet. Therefore, coarse dirt should be removed as soon as possible.
  • Fasten felt gliders to furniture, armchairs and table legs or use suitable floor protection mats in places subject to heavy use, such as desks. This will prevent pressure marks or scratches.
  • In order to protect the parquet floor from water or too much moisture, you should preferably not place houseplants directly on the floor. Use waterproof pots or plant rollers instead.
  • A balanced indoor climate also protects the parquet floor. Therefore, make sure that a humidity between 35 and 45 % and a constant room temperature between 20 and 22°C.
  • It is best to clean your parquet mainly dry with a soft broom or a dry cotton cloth. If you are using a vacuum cleaner, make sure you have a parquet-compatible brush.
  • It is essential that you only wipe the parquet with a damp cloth – preferably with a lint-free cotton mop. If water puddles appear, they must be dried as quickly as possible so that the moisture cannot penetrate the wood.
  • Use only special cleaning and care products that are explicitly suitable for your parquet. This applies to regular cleaning as well as intensive cleaning and care.
  • When cleaning your parquet floor, completely avoid microfibre cloths and aggressive cleaners or abrasive cleaners. Also steam cleaners are rather not suitable for parquet and may – if at all – only be used for fully glued, hard sealed parquet.
  • Get expert advice about the special requirements of your hardwood flooring in terms of cleaning and care. In addition, it is essential that you follow the care instructions of the manufacturer and keep the instructions of your parquet manufacturer carefully.

The full-surface gluing of parquet forms the basis for a stable and durable floor, because the fixed connection with the subfloor provides significant advantages.

However, gluing hardwood flooring involves considerable effort. What is important when gluing parquet and which parquet adhesive is the right one, you will learn in this article.

Parquet adhesive recommendations from this article:

What are the advantages of sticking parquet?

In recent years, the parquet floor seems to have lost some of its importance.

Because many house and apartment owners prefer the floating installation of modern pre-finished parquet, which is faster and less complicated and also usually more cost-effective.

However, if you want to benefit from the advantages of a high-quality and stable floor in the long term, you should still stick the parquet.

Because the gluing of parquet has some decisive advantages:

Due to the fixed connection, parquet adheres firmly to the subfloor for decades, which also makes it easier to sand down and renovate more than once.

Furthermore, glued parquet is also quieter:

impact sound and other noises when using the floor are transmitted less.

Another decisive advantage over floating installation is particularly relevant for parquet on underfloor heating systems:

the gluing process does not create air cushions between the parquet and the subfloor, which improves the thermal conductivity It should be noted, however, that glued parquet cannot be removed so easily if the floor is to be replaced at some point.

What parquet adhesives are there?

The right parquet adhesive is of course decisive for an optimum result when laying glued parquet.

Not every glue is equally suitable for every type of parquet. When purchasing the parquet adhesive, therefore, it is first and foremost important to ensure that the product is matched to both the substrate and the parquet floor to be used.

Manufacturer’s instructions and installation instructions provide important information about this and should therefore be closely monitored.

Due to the continuous development of the adhesive industry, parquet adhesives have improved in recent years.

Most of the products available in specialist shops have not only become more user-friendly in handling and higher quality in terms of adhesion, but also pass the eco-test.

While until a few years ago the proportion of solvents and other controversial ingredients in many parquet adhesives was still very high, there are now a number of ecological products that are equally harmless to humans and the environment.

Well-known manufacturers of parquet adhesives, who are also test winners in various independent product comparisons, are, for example:

  • Retol
  • Ponal
  • Brücol
  • Wakol
  • Sika
  • Stauf
  • Haro
  • Uzin
  • Ardex
  • Schönox
  • Bona
  • Bostik
  • Thomsit
  • u. from above

In general, a distinction can be made between the following parquet adhesives Be:

Silane-based adhesives

The most modern type of parquet adhesives are hybrid adhesives made of MS polymer (modified silane). They are free of solvents, water and isocyanate and are also weather and UV resistant.

This is why they are becoming more and more important and are increasingly replacing solvent adhesives, which are now banned. Silane parquet adhesives are distinguished above all by the fact that they remain permanently elastic after curing and offer the parquet a corresponding scope for swelling and shrinkage. This is why MS parquet adhesives are also universally applicable and suitable for gluing almost all parquet types as well as for use on underfloor heating systems.

Reaction resin adhesives

Reaction resin adhesives also belong to the universally applicable parquet adhesives. These are available both as 1-component PUR adhesives and as 2-component PUR adhesives. While 1-component parquet adhesives remain elastic after curing and are therefore also suitable for bonding stress-bearing parquet, 2-component PUR adhesives cure inelastically and are therefore mainly recommended for shear-resistant parquet laying.

Dispersion adhesives

Dispersion parquet adhesives are also still widely used – especially for the shear-resistant bonding of solid parquet, as they do not give the floor any more room to move after curing. They are mainly water-based and use little or no solvents. However, dispersion adhesives are not quite so easy to use. When laying the parquet, for example, a certain time window must be observed in which the adhesive shows its optimum adhesive properties. It should also be noted that the water content in the adhesive may possibly lead to increased swelling of the parquet.

Powder adhesives

These parquet adhesives consisting of plastic powder or plaster or cement as well as various fillers are also solvent-free adhesives. The powder to be mixed with water is suitable for the laying of low-stress parquet types such as mosaic or multi-layer finished parquet.

Parquet glue with solvents

In addition to the above-mentioned modern parquet adhesives without solvents, there are also some solvent-based products on the market. However, these should – if at all – only be used in individual exceptional cases. In principle, the use of such parquet adhesives is not recommended.

Beware of old parquet adhesives!

Particular care should be taken with older parquet, as the parquet adhesives used at the time may contain harmful ingredients.

Until the 1970s, for example, black parquet adhesive made of coal tar was frequently used , which can contain demonstrably carcinogenic substances such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) or polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

Parquet glued in this way can be dangerous, for example because of a defective sealant:

Because the harmful substances contained therein, such as benzo(a)pyrene, enter the room air via fine cracks in the parquet surface and bind to dust.

However, it is not immediately necessary to remove the floor if there is black glue under the parquet.

However, regular and careful inspection of the parquet surface and a dust test should be carried out to prevent the release of the substance.

However, if you want to be on the safe side, not only must the parquet be completely removed, but also the screed underneath must be chiseled out completely, since abrasive of the black adhesive is not possible due to the dust formation.

In addition to PAH and PCBs, old parquet adhesives may also contain asbestos, which can be released, in particular by demolition or grinding work. Renovation of hardwood flooring with asbestos-containing adhesive should therefore only be carried out by specialist companies, which have been trained accordingly in handling harmful substances.

Gluing parquet: That’s what matters

The basic requirements for gluing parquet are a dry, clean and even substrate as well as optimum room conditions with a temperature of at least 16°C and 40 to 60% humidity.

Before actually starting to glue the parquet, the first three rows of the parquet should first be fitted without parquet adhesive.

In this way, the individual elements can be cut to size and any changes made to the direction of installation.

It is also advisable to become familiar with the application of the parquet adhesive before on a chipboard. In principle, modern parquet adhesives are easy to apply, but handling the putty requires a little practice.

When the parquet is bonded, step by step should be taken.

Since most parquet adhesives have a certain processing time (usually about 30 minutes) in which they have the optimum adhesive strength, only the section should be coated with adhesive on which parquet can also be laid during this time.

Otherwise, there is a risk that the adhesive will decrease and the parquet adhesive will have to be removed again.

What is the best way to apply parquet adhesive?

The parquet adhesive is applied fully and evenly to the respective floor section.

Applying the parquet adhesive works best with a serrated trowel with triangular teeth. Which serration the trowel should have depends on the type of parquet adhesive and the parquet to be laid.

The required thickness of the parquet adhesive and the recommended trowel notch size is normally indicated in the adhesive application instructions.

In addition, there are also generally valid recommendations as to which tooth fillers should be used for the different types of parquet.

These are as follows:

B3: Mosaic parquet, 8 mm parquet

B5: 2-layer parquet up to 60 cm length, Lamparkett

B9: Finished parquet, 10-mm parquet, multi-layer parquet

B11: strip parquet up to 120 cm long, multi-layer parquet up to 60 cm long

B12: Boarded parquet, planks up to 60 cm, multi-layer parquet over 60 cm long

B15: Wooden paving, solid floorboards from 120 cm length and 12 cm width

How much parquet glue is needed?

To calculate the consumption of parquet adhesive, the common recommendation is to calculate with 1.2 kg per square metre.

However, the exact consumption can vary considerably depending on the product and type of parquet – therefore, the manufacturer’s instructions regarding the thickness of the parquet adhesive to be applied should be checked before purchase.

A further calculation basis is to multiply the order quantity of the tooth filler by the number of square meters of the parquet to be laid.

How much do parquet adhesives cost?

Actual costs for the calculated amount of parquet adhesive also depend on the respective product. For example, low-cost dispersion adhesives are available for as low as 3.50 euros per kilo, synthetic resin adhesives cost an average of around 7 euros per kilo, while high-quality parquet adhesives made of reaction resin cost more than 10 euros per kilo.

Remove parquet glue

If parquet is laid glued, sooner or later it is also the removal of the parquet adhesive. How much effort is involved depends on the parquet adhesive used and the type of parquet.

In order to remove smaller adhesive residues from the freshly laid parquet, simple cleaning cloths with a small amount of solvents are usually sufficient.

Alternatively, the residues – possibly previously warmed with a hair dryer – can also be treated with conventional cooking oil.

Furniture polish, erasers made of natural rubber or pure orange oil can also help, as can special adhesive removers, brake cleaners, acetone or spirits.

Larger quantities of parquet adhesivecan to be sanded with a grinding machine. It is important to remove the excess parquet adhesive as soon as possible during installation, because after a maximum of 12 hours most adhesives are completely cured.

However, if full-surface adhesive residues are to be removed after the removal of glued parquet, the procedure is much more complex.

Steam cleaners have increasingly established themselves in recent years as an alternative to wiper mop and buckets in households.

Due to the power of steam, even stubborn dirt can be effectively removed without additional cleaning agents. But are steam cleaners also suitable for use on parquet?

The answer is basically yes – but not for every parquet.

Recommended products from this article:

For which parquet are steam cleaners suitable?

Steam cleaners may only be used on fully bonded, hard-sealed parquet surfaces – for all other types of parquet, steam cleaners not suitable.

With unsealed, but also oiled or waxed parquet the surface remains open-pored, so that the moisture of the steam would penetrate into the floor and cause permanent damage to the parquet.

The natural wood floor reacts to excessive contact with water with increased swelling behaviour – due to the moisture content during steam cleaning, this would sooner or later result in unattractive dents or bulges.

What should be considered when cleaning the steam of parquet floors?

But even with sealed or varnished parquet care must be taken when using steam cleaners:

It is important that the surface is fully intact and does not have any damage that could penetrate moisture. Therefore, before steam cleaning, the parquet should be thoroughly applied to cracks or scratches can be checked.

Before steam cleaning is started, the parquet should be carefully vacuumed with a vacuum cleaner, as coarser dirt and dust particles can cause scratches in the surface.

The lowest amount of steam and the lowest pressure should be set on the steam cleaner for the cleaning of parquet , in order to be able to wipe only with a damp cloth.

Therefore, only devices that can be regulated continuously or those that are clearly declared by the manufacturer as suitable for wooden floors are recommended. Steam cleaners without regulation possibilities are not recommended for hardwood flooring.

The cleaning process itself should be carried out as quickly and evenly as possible.

In order to keep the water film on the parquet as low as possible, it is best to use multilayer wipe covers.

Pausing too long in one place is best avoided. If, however, there is increased moisture, it is necessary to dry the parquet with a dry cloth.

A slight residual moisture, on the other hand, dries up by itself and leaves no streaks or streaks on the parquet floor due to the elimination of cleaning agent residues during steam cleaning.

An even, firm and dry screed is an absolute requirement for the professional laying of parquet and a durable, high-quality floor. In this article you will learn what is important for the professional installation of the subfloor and how long screed for parquet must dry.

Testing of the subsoil

In principle, it is possible to lay parquet on various floors (also existing floor coverings such as PVC, felt or stone) provided they are flat, firm and dry.

The corresponding requirements for the substrate are precisely defined in DIN 18365 for floor covering work and DIN 18356 for parquet work.

If parquet is laid by a specialist, it is subject to a test obligation in accordance with these standards.

Should parquet be inserted on a newly built screed important aspects need to be taken into account in order to meet the conditions for a successful installation.

Flatness

Only a flat surface ensures an optimal result when laying the parquet floor.

Therefore, the flatness of the screed should be checked. This works best with a straight object, such as a straightening bar, a measuring wedge, or a water scale.

If the subfloor does not comply with the standard, the screed must be repaired accordingly before laying parquet.

Strength

In order for the underbody to achieve the necessary level of load-bearing capacity, it must have the appropriate strength.

In particular for the full-surface bonding of parquet using parquet adhesive, a solid screed is the decisive criterion for proper installation.

The condition of the substrate is checked by means of a lattice-scratch test.

For this purpose, diamond-shaped lines are carved into the screed with a pointed object or a special scratching device. There must be no eruptions or seds, otherwise it is not firm enough.

Drying time of the screed

Too much moisture in the subfloor is quite likely to cause damage to the floor covering sooner or later – regardless of whether it is hardwood flooring, vinyl flooring- or cork flooring.

If a new floor is not laid sufficiently dry, it can lead to increased swelling behavior, especially for wooden floors or coverings with support material made of wood fibreboards.

Unattractive dents and bulges, especially in the impact areas, are the result.

Caution is also required with barrier primers, as although moisture penetrates more slowly, it still remains in the house.

Receipt maturity of the screed

Careful procedure, sufficient drying time and exact residual moisture measurement are therefore basic requirements for the readiness of the screed for laying – only then is the subfloor suitable for laying parquet.

Screed is available in various versions, which are reflected in their composition and their drying time. Among the most common species Count:

Cement screed

The most commonly used cement screed consists of sand, cement (as binder) and water – and is therefore one of the flow screeds.

Supplied as a dry mixture, flow screed is mixed directly on site with the addition of water and introduced via a screed pump.

Cement screed is suitable for both indoor and outdoor use due to its moisture resistance and has stable strength values.

During installation and during the drying phase, the ambient temperature must not be below 5°C, draughts and humidity must be avoided – otherwise the surface may become uneven or even cracked.

When is cement screed accessible?

After 2 to 3 days the cement screed can be walked on, after approx. 10 days it can be fully loaded, the readiness for laying is reached after approx. 4 weeks drying phase.

Anhydrite screed

The anhydrite screed, which is also one of the flow screeds, is also enjoying increasing popularity, as the contained binder anhydrite shortens the drying phase.

Due to its good thermal conductivity, anhydrite screed is ideally suited for underfloor heating systems, but on the other hand it is not suitable for outdoor use, as the screed becomes unusable on contact with water.

Dry screed

There is no drying time when dry screed is used. Prefabricated panels made of plasterboard, wood-based material or cement-bound chipboard glued or screwed on the raw floor. Unevenness or too low construction heights must be balanced with granules or be piled up.

In addition, there are other, less common screed screeds such as magnesite screed, cast asphalt screed or synthetic resin screed.

Residual moisture determination

When drying ledges, approximately 1 cm of screed per week is generally considered to be a guideline.

If the screed is over 4 cm thick, two additional weeks should be taken into account, as it has an extended binding time.

In the case of underfloor heating, it is also recommended to heat the screed completely afterwards.

For this purpose, the flow temperature of the underfloor heating system is increased to two thirds of the heating load in 5°C increments and then lowered again. A detailed heating protocol should be kept for control.

After the drying or heating phase, an exact test of the residual moisture is necessary.

Measuring points that have already been set when the screed is applied facilitate the process and ensure a reliable result. Fast binders can affect the values and should therefore be disclosed.

The permissible residual moisture depends on both the type of as well as whether or not underfloor heating is available. Depending on the screed, the standard values are as follows:

  • cement screed: 2 % without floor heating / 1.8 % with floor heating
  • anhydrite screed: 0.5 % without underfloor heating / 0.3 % with underfloor heating
  • magnesite line: max. 4 %

Some parquet adhesives are already approved for higher residual moisture. However, the manufacturer’s information should always be treated with caution.

Moisture measurement with CM method

For residual moisture determination, the measurement is recommended using the CM method (calcium carbide method).

For this purpose, the pressure pressure of a crushed and shaken with calcium carbide is measured with a special device and determined as a value for the residual moisture using a conversion table.

Since the measurement is in principle very complex – and also the only approved test procedure for the publisher’s stiffener – it is recommended to contact a specialist.

Whether parquet, carpet or laminate – excessive load is not good for the floor.

Especially at workplaces with desk and office chair, the floor is heavily stressed.

A floor protection mat as a chair mat prevents damage and protects the floor covering.

Office chair pads – the optimal floor protection

Desk chairs with castors can quickly leave marks on the floor – carpets are rubbed off, hard floors such as parquet or laminate are defaced by scratches or nicks.

Floor protection mats should therefore not be missing under any office chair, as parquet savers or carpet protectors offer effective protection against damage.

Office chair pads are available in a wide variety of designs, colours, sizes and materials.

Which floor saver is best suited depends on several criteria:

On which floor ingesenator is the floor protection used?

There is the right protective mat for every floor.

The offer includes floor protection mats for carpet as well as floor protection mats for hard flooring and parquet.

The surfaces all have a non-slip underside, the surface is often even coated with an antibacterial coating, so that dirt and bacteria have no chance.

Floor protection mats for carpet

As a chair pad for textile floor coverings, the special carpet floor protection mats are equipped with blunt anchor tops on the underside of the mat. These ensure a secure grip so that the protective mat cannot slip.

How long the anchors should be depends on the height of the carpet.

Thanks to the carpet saver, the carpet is neither flattened nor soiled by the rollers of the desk chair and the floor remains beautiful for longer.

Soil protection mats for hard flooring

Hard floors include flooring such as wood, parquet, laminate, tiles, stone, PVC, vinyl and cork.

In contrast to floor protection mats for carpets, floor protectors for hard floors do not have bumps, but have a special non-slip profile.

It is smooth and protects the floor without the underlay slipping.

Floor protection mats for parquet

Hard-floor office chair mats are also suitable as parquet savers.

Its smooth underside has proven to be parquet protection.

The protective mats not only prevent scratches or sanding marks, but also protect the parquet from stains and moisture in case something falls to the floor.

Which material is used as a chair pad for the respective application?

Soil protection mats can be made of different materials, all of which have certain properties and advantages.

Apart from the flooring, personal preferences and requirements for the office chair base are also decisive for the material decision.

PET (polyethylene terephthalate)

Pet floor savers are partly made from recycled bottles and are therefore environmentally friendly.

They also score points for their durability and are highly translucent. They have an effect footfall sound insulation and are also suitable for use on underfloor heating systems.

Polypropylene

Also suitable for underfloor heating and in addition odourless and skin-friendly are floor protection mats made of polypropylene.

They withstand high loads, are scratch-resistant and water-repellent.

Polycarbonate

Due to the properties of polycarbonate, desk chair pads made of this material have a very long service life.

They are not only extremely resilient and hard-wearing, but also resistant to weather, heat and radiation. Also plasticizers or solvents are not contained in these mats.

Natural rubber

Floor protection mats made of the renewable raw material natural rubber are water-repellent and very elastic. The material is also tear-resistant and has an antistatic effect.

What shape or colour should the floor protection mat have?

Due to different designs and colours, the office chair underlay can become quite an eye-catcher.

Those who attach importance to discreet floor protection are well advised with transparent chair documents.

They are barely visible and still offer the desired effect.

The form of the office chair pad depends primarily on the arrangement of the desk.

It is important that the shape of the floor protection mat covers the entire workplace as far as possible.

Lips on the mats provide additional protection against wetness and dirt on shoe soles.

How big should the underlay be?

Like the shape, the size of the desk chair underlay depends on the workstation.

In accordance with the workplace regulation, the freedom of movement must be at least 1.5 m2.

With regard to the dimensions of the floor protection mat, the larger the floor protection.

In addition to the standard sizes, many manufacturers also offer custom-made floor savers.

Attaching and cleaning floor protection mats

In order to protect the floor effectively and sustainably, care must be taken to properly attach the office chair pad.

For floor protection mats for carpets, the smooth side represents the surface, the toped side represents the underside.

In contrast, floor protection mats for hard floors or floor protection mats for parquet have the smooth side at the bottom and the rough side at the top.

The cleaning of floor savers is best done with pure water and subsequent re-drying with a soft cloth.

In the case of heavy contamination, household general-purpose cleaners can be added, sharp or corrosive agents as well as alcohol- and salmiak-holding cleaners should be dispensed with altogether.

If parquet is arched or swollen, excessive moisture is often the reason.

While superficial water damage can be detected quickly and easily, the cause can also be hidden under the floor. In this article you will learn what causes excessive moisture under the parquet and how to proceed in case of water damage.

How does parquet react to moisture?

As a natural wooden floor, parquet always reacts to water.

What is of great advantage in terms of indoor climate and feel-good atmosphere on the one hand can lead to damage in the parquet floor on the other hand.

Too high humidity leads to an increased swelling behavior of the parquet – unsightly deformations are the result.

A different image is created depending on where the water comes from:

  • Moisture spreads from below, parquet forms convex – it swells up and the middle of the rods curves upwards or comes up.
  • If moisture enters from above, the deformations are concave – the so-called “bowl” occurs, the parquet deforms like a bowl, with the edges facing upwards.

Causes of water damage in the parquet

Water damage in the parquet can have many causes. While a fallen water bucket or a room flooded by an leaking washing machine is quickly discovered, there are a number of water damage that is not so obvious.

Thus, the damage is often not noticed until the parquet is swelled or curves. Then it is said to get to the bottom of the matter quickly in order to limit the damage as much as possible.

There are the following options:

Too moist screed

If it is a new building, the parquet may have been on a screed that was too damp.

In order for a newly erected screed to be suitable for laying parquet, it must be completely dry.

As a guideline, a drying time of approx. one week per cm of screed – a classic cement screed is therefore usually sufficiently dried after about 4 weeks. In order to be certain, a residual moisture determination must be carried out using the CM method before laying the hardwood flooring, which determines exactly whether the values are within the approved standard.

Defective water pipes or heating pipes

If there are water or heating pipes – for example from a underfloor heating system – under the hardwood flooring, the water damage may also have been caused by a leak in these pipes. In this case, moisture penetrates into the parquet from below, but this can go unnoticed for a while.

Too high humidity

Particularly with floating parquet laid , bulging can also be caused by excessive humidity. If, in addition, too little space has been left around the edges or at door thresholds to give the parquet the necessary room to swell and shrink, it will mainly come up at the joints.

Water damage in the parquet – what to do?

No matter what the cause is – in case of water damage in the parquet, the motto applies:

The quicker the damage is repaired, the smaller are the consequences and the more likely it is that the parquet can be repaired.

As soon as a water damage has been detected in the parquet, the therefore be acted upon as soon as possible. In this way, it is not only avoid irreparable damage, but it also prevents mold formation, which could sometimes spread to the entire floor construction.

Parquet has the great advantage that it can be easily repaired in most cases with slight to moderate water damage.

A real wood floor is completely destroyed only if the water is on the floor for a long time or the parquet elements in it “float”.

In contrast to other floor coverings, such as laminate, parquet can therefore usually be easily renovated – even the repair of individual damaged areas is possible.

The cost of repairing or remediation measures depends accordingly on the extent of the water damage.

Eliminate superficial water damage in the parquet

Water damage to the surface of the parquet is best repaired by first wiping the water as quickly as possible.

Afterwards, the parquet must dry completely.

If the floor was only in contact with the water for a short time – for example, because a bucket was spilled – it is sufficient to provide the necessary draught in the room by aeration. The affected area can then be treated with a suitable care product.

In the case of larger or longer floods – e.g. due to leaking washing machines or floods – the residual moisture from the parquet and the air must be removed over a longer period of time by a dehumidifier.

It is important to keep windows and doors closed during the entire drying phase – with the exception of impulse ventilation – windows and doors.

Suitable equipment can be rented at DIY stores or specialist companies, the costs for this are usually covered by the insurance.

In addition, in the case of major surface damage, the water may also have penetrated into the joints of the parquet and thus spread moisture under the floor.

If this risk exists, a expert or expert should definitely be consulted, who will examine the water damage in detail and plan further measures if necessary.

Repair water damage below the parquet

If the source of the water damage is below the parquet, has probably already passed some time, which is the expense of the Damage is eliminated.

The most important thing is to eliminate the cause of water ingress. To do this, it is usually necessary to remove the parquet at the affected area. Later the parquet can be fixed again with parquet adhesive.

Once the damage has been repaired, the entire underbody – especially the screed – must first completely dry up before the hole can be closed again.

The use of a drying device is also recommended for this purpose.

In addition, any existing bulk material should be removed. Only when the soil has completely dried out and there are no signs of mold formation, the affected area can be filled with new bulk material and the hole can be closed with new parquet elements.

The old hardwood flooring will probably be too damaged by the effects of water to be reused. Colour differences in the decor can be compensated for by special oils or lacquers or a new parquet sealing.

Signs of mold infestation

If a musty, fashionable or earthy smell goes out after a water damage, this is usually an indication that mold has formed under the parquet.

The extent of the infestation and the possible spread to the dwelling can be investigated by means of an appropriate expert opinion.

If mould is actually found, the parquet must be completely removed and often also the screed underneath must be renovated.

A new screed may only be introduced if the residual moisture in the room is below 4 percent – after that, the corresponding drying time must be observed before a new parquet can be laid.

Since the highest care is required in the refurbishment of parquet after a water damage with mould infestation, the measures should be carried out by a specialist.

A parquet floor is not only versatile and visually appealing, but also convinces with its durability.

The decisive criterion for the service life is what thickness the parquet has.

An overview of the commercialstrengths and the different structure of parquet floors can be found in this article.

In which thicknesses is parquet available?

The thickness of the parquet depends on which parquet type it is.

Parquet is basically available in two versions, which differ fundamentally in their structure – and thus in their actual thickness – :

Solid parquet (one-layer parquet)

The classic solid parquet (also known as single-layer parquet) consists of a continuous layer of solid wood, which is first laid in its raw state fully glued over the entire surface and only then sanded and surface-treated.

The installation of solid wood parquet is on the one hand relatively costly and time-consuming, as the floor only becomes ready for use and walkable after several work steps. On the other hand, the thickness of the solid parquet also ensures particularly high resistance and durability.

Solid parquet is available in different thicknesses between 8 and 23 mm.

Due to its thickness, it can be sanded down several times in the course of renovation work .

If one assumes that hardwood flooring is in need of renovation every 10 to 15 years due to wear and damage and that approx. 0.3 to 0.5 mm of the parquet surface is removed per grinding process, solid hardwood flooring has a service life of several decades.

The most common variants of solid parquet floors and their strengths Are:

  • strip parquet:
    14 to 23 mm, can be sanded 5 – 7 times
  • ship bottom:
    14 to 23 mm, can be sanded 5 – 7 times
  • mosaic parquet:
    8 to 10 mm, can be sanded 4 – 5 times
  • lamp parquet:
    6 to 15 mm (standard: 10 mm), can be sanded 4 – 5 times
  • panel parquet:
    approx. 10 mm (occasionally up to 20 mm), can be sanded 4 – 5 times

Prefabricated parquet (multi-layer parquet)

In contrast to the solid parquet, finished or multi-layer parquet consists of several layers glued together.

It is already ready for installation and is surface-treated with a layer sealed by oil or varnish, so that it can be walked immediately after installation.

Finished parquet is available as 2-layer or 3-layer parquet. 2-layer parquet consists of a carrier material made of wood composite panels or cheap wood, which is glued to a wear layer of high-quality real wood.

3-layer parquet contains in addition to this a counter-layer – also made of wood or wood composites – which makes the floor even more stable.

Decisive for the quality of prefabricated parquet is the useful layer:

This consists of different types of wood and should have a thickness of at least 2.5 mm.

The principle applies here:

The higher the thickness of the useful layer of the parquet, the higher the quality of the floor and the higher its service life.

The total thickness of the parquet is therefore made up of the thickness of the of the carrier material and the useful layer. Commercially available prefabricated parquet has the following common strengths:

2-layer hardwood flooring:

total thickness 10 to 16 mm, wear layer 3 to 6 mm, can be sanded 2 – 3 times

3-layer hardwood flooring:

total thickness 10 to 25 mm, wear layer 3 to 8 mm, can be sanded 2 – 4 times

Special shape: veneer parquet

Veneer parquet is considered a special form of hardwood flooring, as it combines the special features of wood and laminate floors:

Precious wood veneers with a doctored, multi-coated surface are glued with water-resistant HDF support plates.

The total thickness of veneer parquet is also between 10 and 23 mm. But veneer parquet cannot be sanded down in any other way than the classic finished parquet because the wear layer is less than 1 mm thick.

What does the parquet strength have an effect on?

Strength plays a role in the selection of the parquet in several respects:

On the one hand, the acquisition costs are usually higher for thicker parquet, on the other hand, the strength has a significant impact on the life span of the floor, which in turn makes the investment quite worthwhile.

Parquet with a higher thickness not only withstands the daily stress better, but can also be sanded more often, which is important for carrying out renovation work.

Wear or damage to the parquet can be removed relatively easily by sanding. As a guideline, parquet floors should be renovated every 10 to 15 years and approx. 0.3 to 0.5 mm of the parquet surface should be removed per sanding operation.

The strength of the parquet is also relevant in terms of spatial conditions.

Parquet floors with less thickness are advantageous, for example, in rooms that require a lower height of the overall floor construction. But even in transitions, such as at door sills, the strength of the parquet can be decisive.

In addition, the thickness of the parquet – together with the type of wood used – also has an effect on the thermal resistance at underfloor heating systems. The higher the thickness of the parquet, the more sluggishly the underfloor heating reacts and the slower the room heats up. However, other factors also play a role here, such as the parquet adhesive.

Oiled parquet has many advantages, but also needs the right care.

Regularly re-oiling not only makes wear and tear disappear and the hardwood flooring shines in all its glory again, but the floor also receives care and protection. In this article you will learn how to oil your hardwood flooring best and which parquet oils are suitable for this purpose.

What is oiled parquet?

At the same time as the laying of parquet, the question of the optimum surface finish also arises.

This protects the parquet from dirt and moisture and preserves its characteristic appearance.

Parquet can either be lacquered lacquered or oiled or waxed, whereby the latter has become less and less common in recent years. Which surface finish is the best cannot be said in general terms – it depends on the individual demands on the floor. There are certain differences, especially with regard to appearance and care requirements.

Pros and cons of oiled parquet

While lacquered parquet is fully sealed by the lacquer, oiled parquet is “only” impregnated.

This means that the pores remain open and the wood can continue to breathe, which has a positive effect on the indoor climate. The oil gives the parquet its typical silky matte appearance and underlines the characteristic feel of the wood, which improves the naturalness of the floor.

On the other hand, however, oiled parquet has no additional protective layer. Accordingly, loads and daily stresses act directly on the surface of the floor, which is why wear and tear or damage can occur more quickly.

However, any repair work on oiled parquet can be carried out relatively easily – and also partially – on oiled parquet. Even in the case of major damage, it is often not necessary to sand down the entire floor – re-oiling the affected parquet is sufficient in most cases. Overall, the maintenance and cleaning requirement is nevertheless higher for oiled parquet compared to lacquered surfaces.

What oil is available for parquet?

For the treatment of oiled parquet there are various special parquet oils, which saturate the wood surface and provide protection against moisture and dirt.

When purchasing parquet oil care should be taken to ensure that it is as solvent-free a product as possible, as this is better for the parquet and the room climate as well as for the environment.

In principle, between curing and non-curing oils. Curing oils – also known as 2-component oils – contain synthetic resins that allow the oil to dry faster on the one hand and on the other hand, provide more resistance to the treated surface. Many of these parquet oils offer almost the same protection as a sealing of the soil.

Non-hardening oils or hard oils, on the other hand, usually consist of a mixture of different oils, e.g. linseed oil and walnut oil, and are regarded as particularly natural.

The pores of the wood remain completely open, whereby a parquet floor oiled with hard oil ensures a particularly good exchange of air in the room and also absorbs odours.

However, the surface of the parquet remains more sensitive to dirt and damage, which is why the floor should be additionally waxed afterwards.

Alternatively, hard wax oils can also be used, which are now increasingly produced without solvents on a purely natural basis.

The combination of certain oils and waxes forms a thin layer on the parquet, which closes the wood pores to a certain degree and accordingly in the basic features comes close to a sealing.

Thus, the air exchange between wood and indoor air is restricted, but parquet treated with hard wax oil is also easier to maintain.

The range of different parquet oils is very diverse. The differences between the individual products lie in their composition and their life span.

In contrast to lacquer, oil cannot change the gloss level of the parquet – oiled floors are always matt – but the wood can be stained with special coloured oils in a wide variety of nuances.

In general, the color of the parquet becomes a trace darker or richer due to the oiling.

However, parquet can be oiled also white with specially pigmented products, which makes the floor slightly lighter and makes it look as if it has been freshly sanded.

An impregnation of the parquet – and the associated protection against moisture and dirt – is achieved with coloured oils just as with conventional colourless parquet oils.

Many parquet manufacturers either offer their own coordinated parquet oils or make product recommendations for suitable oils. Therefore, before re-oiling parquet, the manufacturer’s instructions for the respective parquet should be observed.

Oils or waxes?

Rubbing wooden floors with beeswax to protect it from dirt and damage has previously been a proven method.

Pure waxed parquet has become increasingly important in recent years. However, the combination of oil and wax is still very popular with parquet in order to underline the naturalness of the parquet in the best possible way and to provide the wood with appropriate protection.

This is because the surface of purely oiled parquet remains relatively sensitive and receives additional protection through the wax .

Both warm and cold wax can be used after the parquet oil has completely dried. While cold wax can sometimes also be rubbed evenly into the wood by hand with a sponge, warm wax requires a special wax machine with which the wax is heated and applied to the parquet at a constant temperature. After the parquet has grown, the parquet must be polished – preferably with a polishing machine.

Parquet oiling: How it works

Regardless of which parquet oil the floor is treated with, should be done when oiling parquet according to the following instructions:

Reworking the parquet

Before the parquet can be re-oiled, it must be completely sanded down. This is usually necessary even with newly laid parquet, if only to remove possible residues of the parquet adhesive. It is important to proceed extremely evenly and carefully and to work your way from coarse to fine on the raw wood in several passes. Only in this way can the oil penetrate deep into the pores of the wood and achieve the desired result.

Since sanding down the parquet is quite demanding, this should only be carried out by experienced do-it-yourselfers on their own.

2. Thorough cleaning

Sanding the hardwood flooring produces a lot of fine dust. Since parquet oil binds it, all surfaces in the room must be thoroughly cleaned with a vacuum cleaner, so that a completely dust-free environment is guaranteed.

3. Ensuring proper room conditions

The oiling of parquet requires certain room conditions. For example, the parquet should not be exposed to direct sunlight, so that it does not heat up too much. The room temperature should be between 18 and 25 degrees when the parquet oil is applied.

4. Filling joints

The dust produced by sanding the parquet is also ideal for repairing smaller, damaged joints when mixed with joint filler. For larger joints, however, the use of special joint sealing compound is recommended.

5. Apply parquet oil

Once the preparations have been completed, the actual oiling of the parquet can be started.

First stir the parquet oil thoroughly and then apply it evenly and systematically to the parquet. It is best to start in a corner and work towards the exit. Surfaces with more than 30 m2 should be oiled in sections so that the oil does not dry too quickly.

A scooter or a brush suitable for wooden floors can be used to distribute the oil.

It works even easier when a small amount of oil is carefully poured onto the parquet and smeared with a rubber scraper or a stainless steel smoothing. For corners and edges, it is recommended to use a brush.

As an alternative to applying the parquet oil by hand, polishing machines can also be used. The white/beige polishing pad is used to distribute and massage the oil on the parquet.

6. Allow oil to act

The thinly applied parquet oil then requires around 15 minutes to be able to move into the wood. If parquet is oiled with too much oil, you can stains are created. Therefore, it is important to ensure that there are no oil puddles on the parquet.

7. Remove oil residues

After the start-up time, the excess oil is removed with dry, lint-free cotton cloths.

The oil-soaked cloths should then be placed in a bucket of water, otherwise there is a risk of spontaneous combustion. Please take this very seriously. Whole houses have burned down just because a cloth soaked in oil ignited itself.

8. Let oil dry

If sufficient ventilation is provided, the surface is then Night completely dried. If the colour result is not yet intensive enough, the operation can be repeated again.

When is parquet accessible again after oiling?

Parquet flooring can be walked on again carefully around 24 hours after oiling, but furniture should only be set up after 48 hours and carpets should only be laid after one week.

If the parquet has been committed too early, footprints may remain in the surface.

If this occurs, the oil should be wiped away as soon as possible. If the oil has already dried, the place can be rubbed again with oil or sanded slightly.

Even with the mopping of the parquet should be waited at least one week. desk mats, or chair mats should only be re-applied after approx. 14 days.

Parquet re-oiling – how often?

Freshly sanded parquet should in principle be 2 times thoroughly treated with high-quality parquet oil. The time interval to the next After-oiling depends on the type of parquet oil used, the degree of stress and also according to the type of wood.

While oxidative curing oils have to be re-oiled after 1 to 2 years – and even earlier in the case of heavy loads – two-component oils offer longer protection due to the additional chemical reaction and usually only have to be re-oiled every 3 to 5 years.

In order to maintain the protection of the oiled parquet for as long as possible and to delay the need for grinding, especially unwaxed floors should be refreshed at regular intervals with special care oils.

Like any other floor, parquet wears off over time. Regular polishing not only restores parquet to new gloss, but also protects the floor better against dirt, dust and moisture.

Recommended polishing machines from this article:

How to polish your parquet in the best way and which polishing machines can be used for it, you will learn in the following article.

Why is parquet polishing useful?

parquet is exposed to more or less high loads every day, which leave their marks over time. In addition to the daily cleaning, parquet therefore also needs regular care to keep it beautiful and to increase its lifespan. Although the service life can be considerably extended by protective measures such as support for office chairs, at some point even this no longer helps.

Polishing parquet is a proven method of freshening up the floor. First and foremost, polishing parquet achieves a visual effect, but at the same time it also makes the floor more resistant to dirt, dust and moisture. In addition, polishing small scratches or signs of wear and tear can be removed from the hardwood flooring without having to sand the entire floor.

When and how often is parquet to polish?

At what intervals parquet is to be polished is related to the degree of stress.

With average wear, parquet should be polished once or twice a year. However, it may also be necessary more often if the parquet is exposed to heavy loads, normal cleaning is no longer sufficient to remove contaminants or if the floor simply does not like any more. Especially before winter, polishing the parquet is recommended, as the floor is better protected from the impending increased load of wet and dirty shoes.

Can any parquet be polished?

The surface of parquet can be either varnished, oiled or waxed – any parquet can be polished.

However, there may be some differences in effort. With oiled and waxed parquet, the floor is only impregnated and the pores of the wood remain open. As a result, the oil or wax dissens over time and the gloss of the parquet decreases.

Therefore oiled or waxed parquet needs more care than lacquered parquet.

In this variant, the surface is completely sealed by the paint. The protective layer also decreases over time, but usually primarily in places with heavy stress. Sealed parquet is therefore sometimes less frequent polishing or it may be sufficient to merely partially repolish the claimed areas.

Polishing parquet: How it works

The preparation

Before polishing the parquet can begin, the floor must be prepared accordingly.

It is best to remove furniture and carpets from the room so that the parquet is completely clear. Afterwards, all dust and dirt must be thoroughly removed from the hardwood flooring with the vacuum cleaner or broom; cleaning with a damp cloth should also be carried out.

Before the polishing process is also the optimal time to carry out repair work on the parquet. Small scratches, cracks or holes can be treated with a repair kit and then polished. It is important that the processed areas are completely dry before the polishing process starts.

The polishing process

Earlier on, polishing hardwood flooring was a time-consuming and laborious process. Heated floor wax was applied to the parquet by hand or with bulky and heavy floor polishing machines. This resulted in a wax layer covering the entire surface during each polishing process, which sometimes chipped off in places with little wear and tear, e.g. under furniture, thus necessitating extensive basic cleaning or even the abrasive removal of the entire floor.

What polishing with?

Nowadays liquid polish is mainly used for polishing parquet.

It consists, among other things, of plastics or synthetic resin, which makes it particularly well adhered and tear-resistant and also easier to process.

Modern parquet polishes are commercially available as a ready-to-use mixture or for enriching with water and in a glossy or matt finish. When buying the polish, make sure that it does not contain silicone oils or derivatives of mineral oils, as these can damage the parquet.

Many manufacturers also offer special polishes for their parquet – therefore, the manufacturer’s instructions and recommendations should be observed when polishing.

How the polish is applied to the parquet depends on the respective product. There are polishing agents in spray bottles that can be sprayed onto the floor.

Others, on the other hand, must first be diluted with water and applied to the parquet with a mop or cloth. Only now does the actual polishing begin.

If parquet is polished by hand, the polish is uniformly incorporated into the parquet with a wool or polishing cloth in fast, circular movements until the desired gloss effect is created.

Especially with unsealed parquet, a second polishing process may be necessary.

Polishing machines for parquet

However, manual polishing of parquet is very force- and time-consuming.

The polishing process works much more easily with special polishing machines for parquet – also called bohner machines or blockers.

These are equipped with various polishing pads, which can be used, depending on the application, for removing dirt, for basic cleaning, for re-oiling parquet or for incorporateing the polish.

The dead weight of the polishing machine generates considerably more pressure on the polishing pad than would be possible with manual polishing, and this not only makes the polishing process easier and faster, but also ensures a more efficient result.

In principle A car polishing machine can also be used for polishing parquet. However, this is only recommended in the marginal areas, polishing the entire floor surface would be much too complicated.

In most DIY stores or specialist retailers there are polishing machines for parquet to rent or rent – the cost is around 20 to 30 euros per day plus deposit.

Of course, polishing machines are also available for purchase, although the acquisition costs are usually relatively high.

However, with regular use, the investment can still be worthwhile. Polishing machines for private use are usually not only suitable for refreshing parquet, but also for growing and polishing other floors.

parquet is a robust and durable floor covering. Nevertheless, it can happen that a new floor is desired in the course of renovation or remodelling and laminate is chosen. The question then arises as to the correct procedure for laying laminate on hardwood flooring.

Which parquet is suitable as a substrate for laminate?

In general, it should be noted that laminate can not be laid on every type of parquet.

Only fully glued parquet is suitable as a subfloor for the new floor – in this case there is nothing to prevent direct installation.

Laying laminate on floating parquet is not recommended. In this case the parquet should first be completely removed before the new floor can be laid.

What should be considered when laying laminate on parquet?

Apart from the fact that the parquet must be fully glued, there are a number of other factors involved in the laying of laminate must be taken into account on parquet:

Just like the screed when laying a new floor, the parquet must be clean, dry and level before the laminate can be laid on it. Larger unevenness should be levelled in advance by sanding or filling with levelling compound. However, minor unevenness of approx. 1 to 2 mm can usually be compensated with a impact sound insulation for parquet .

The impact sound insulation is highly recommended for laminate on parquet because the combination of the two floor coverings would otherwise be very noisy.

Moisture-permeable insulating materials such as cork or cardboard are suitable. It is even easier if a laminate with integrated footfall sound insulation is used.

A vapour barrier, on the other hand, should not be used for laminate parquet always. Parquet is a wooden floor that absorbs or releases moisture. This could easily cause waterlogging under the PVC film, which would result in permanent damage to the floor.

In order to achieve more stability of the floor, the laminate should be laid crosswise to the existing parquet. It should be noted, however, that light incidence can cause a changed joint pattern.

The use of click laminate is recommended, as this is not only relatively easy to install without expert help, but can also be removed again without leaving any residue, as it does not have to be glued.

Since laminate expands and contracts again with temperature fluctuations, expansion joints should be taken into account when laying laminate on hardwood flooring. This gives the floor the necessary clearance without causing undesirable joint formation or dents.

If laminate is laid on hardwood flooring, this changes the construction height, or thickness of the flooring. It may therefore be necessary to shorten door frames or leaves accordingly. Height differences at transitions can be laminated with profiles.